ShitHarperDid thinks you matter. Here's why.

Every day the Harper Conservatives spend over $215,000 of our tax dollars1 on advertising that tells us how awesome the Harper Conservatives are.

That’s five times what the average Canadian makes in a year—enough cash to buy 331 iPhone 5s every day.


The ShitHarperDid community was created to counter this multi-million dollar PR machine. During the 2011 election, we started out as a few artists. With your help we became an unprecedented national community of people speaking truth to power. Together we reached millions of Canadians, “wreaking havoc on the Conservative party’s image”2 in the process.  

Think of us as the little website that could (but can’t without you).

"Knowing is half the battle." — GI Joe

Only one third of us (Canadians under 35) are “very interested” in keeping up with the news, which makes sense ‘cause Canadian news is often either boring or depressing—or both. In collaboration with you, our award-winning Comedy Team is devoted to changing that.

"The second half of the battle involves people coming together to create positive change." — Definitely not GI Joe

A lot of big movements have started as "just an internet thing": Google, Twitter, the French Revolution (we assume). We have equipped the SHD community with an evolving set of innovative tools to turn online sharing into real world action. Our experienced Action Team is dedicated to working with you to develop creative and effective direct action in your community and across the country.

FAQ

You do realize that Harper won that election IE. you failed, right?

Yeah, the election didn't go our way—a poor robot called us with the sad results. But we just barely lost. If only 6,215 more people had voted 3, the Conservatives wouldn’t have a “majority” government.

Yeah but you still lost, so why not accept that most Canadians like Harper? Deal with it.

Well actually only 39.6% of voters wanted this government. We are the 60.4%!

Okay, sure. Maybe the majority of people don’t like this government, but what difference can a stupid website make?

After the 2011 vote, Elections Canada investigated us. We didn’t understand why and avoided their calls for several days, hoping the heat would die down—you know, like in the movies. Turned out they were investigating us because if you spend more than $500 to influence an election you’re supposed to register your campaign with them.

We had no idea and had not registered—but also—we had only spent about $250 on our campaign. As a result Elections Canada officially recommended that federal election rules be changed to account for the big impact that our little campaign had.

Together we reached millions of Canadians, not by spending money, but through the active participation of people like you. And that is why you matter.

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